Dear Dan:

It gives me great of pleasure to tell you my experience with your employee Ms. Rebecca Abbott. I own number of apartments buildings in valley and Glendale it is almost ten years that I am member with AOA.  Rebecca Abbott was my advisor and every time I talked to her she was able to answer all the questions.   She is very professional and it has been pleasure to work with her.  Medick M.

Dear Editor:

Most recently, Berlin, Germany adopted a severe rent control ordinance – all rents are frozen for five years.  Any violation would be subject to sanctions and penalties of $500,000 or more.

In April, Oregon passed a statewide rent control law, the first in the nation.   Rents were frozen and capped and a new formula for vested tenants after the first 12 months.  The annual adjustment would be 7% and a new formula for inflation.

Three units or less were exempt and an owner can remove a tenant for a substantial capital improvement.  The relocation assistance will be modest.

On May 29, 2019, the California State Assembly moved AB 1482, which also proposed a rent cap, to the Senate.  Pasadena, Glendale, Beverly Hills, Inglewood, Long Beach, Concord and perhaps Culver City are all moving toward some form of rent stabilization.  Liberal/Progressive L.A. City Councilpersons now to tax vacant units. Apparently, they have not read the state’s Ellis Act.

Tenants need to pay for water, sewage and trash.  Tenants need to pay one half of the cost of earthquake retrofitting and at least 75% of all mandated health and safety protocols such as stars and balconies refurbishing, carbon monoxide appliances and smoke alarms.  Michael Millman

Dear Council Members:

I own and rent a condo and single family house in Culver City and both of my tenants have very high incomes and live very well. I’m working very hard to pay the mortgages, taxes, insurance, fees and repairs. This is all of my retirement income. Why are you asking me to support my wealthy tenants?

If you do this, I will NOT build or buy another property in Culver City and I’ll take the house off the market and move back in. So, your plan would:

1)  Reduce my retirement income

2)  Require me to support my wealthy Tenants

3)  Remove one of my properties from the rental market

4)  Make sure I never build a rental unit in Culver City

5)  NOT INCREASE NUMBER OF RENTAL UNITS

6)  NOT HELP THE HOMELESS

7)  NOT GET YOU RE-ELECTED TO OFFICE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   Jerry R

Dear Council People:

Culver City is an expensive place to live because the schools are good and the downtown area is very, very popular.  It will not work to force owners to restrict rents; people on lower incomes won’t even be able to eat downtown! You will change the whole dynamic of the city for the worse by forcing the hand of what should be a normal market force.  If a unit for rent is too high, no one will rent it and the owner will have to lower the price.  If it’s too low, there will be many candidates. 

If owners have paid much of the taxes to renovate downtown and keep the schools at a high level, why shouldn’t they get more rent for their units? Maybe the city should subsidize affordable housing- why would the owners do it- they who pay all the costs!   Apt. owner CC

Hello City Council Members:

As a Realtor representing many renters and property owners of all price ranges and economic and social scales, you must realize that it is a fact that the more restrictions you put on housing, the more difficult it is for everyone to enjoy their home peacefully and equitably.

When you limit the Just Cause Evictions to very few, landlords will end up with the bad apple that will make the life of all other good tenants miserable in their own “rent protected” homes.  We’ve seen many cases where the quiet clean people (including families and people from all walks of life, races, nationalities) want to keep themselves and/or their children in a good safe environment.  But the one bad tenant who is protected under just cause eviction makes their lives intolerable, so the good ones end up leaving and looking for other housing, even though they do not want to.

Landlords should be able to evict people who cause a nuisance; that includes noise, waste on the property, having too many guests and parties, too many cars parked everywhere, foul language that is heard all times of the day and night, destruction to property or just not properly maintaining and keeping the property in a sanitary condition.

Tenants must have an incentive to be good tenants.  You cannot give them an incentive to be bad tenants.  If they know they cannot be evicted, the bad ones will have incentives to give everyone a hard time so that they are evicted and can collect relocation costs.

Good tenants, regardless of race, color, nationality, orientation, or familial status or any other factor are an asset to landlords.  Landlords are not sitting there counting their cash and wanting to take advantage of tenants.  It is a big job and expense to purchase property, maintain it, rent it, keep tenants happy, and hope tenants keep paying rent.  It is already very difficult and costly to evict a tenant for non-payment of rent, you should not force people to restrict housing as well.  Everyone suffers.

Landlords should be able to reduce rent when needed and increase it when needed, as the economy dictates.  With rent controls, landlords will not be able to reduce rents in a recession, fearing they will not be able to increase them again later.

Expenses related to property are not capped at any level, how can you cap the income?  When a roof needs to be repaired or replaced, or parking lot re-paved, or damage by tenants to units done, all that costs a lot of money to repair.  How do you expect landlords to foot the bill without going bankrupt?

Remember, most of the landlords are regular people who have worked hard and saved all their lives to make an investment to provide for their families’ needs and their retirement.  You should not force individual private investors to subsidize other individuals (their tenants).  Marguerite, Realtor

Honorable Los Angeles County Supervisors:

We now have Statewide Rent Control laws for landlords to deal with. Having another layer of rent control laws by L.A. County on top of this is really redundant.

How much regulation is really needed?  How much money and time must landlords spend dealing with regulation upon regulation? 

You would like rents to be lower? We do too. How can we keep rents lower while having to deal with so very many, many regulations?

Managing properties would be easy if not for all the requirements made by government. We spend more than half our time dealing with regulations instead of using this time to help out our residents. PLEASE STOP!!!   Enough regulation. The State has done enough. Piling on is unproductive.  

On January 1, 2020, landlords will have Statewide Rent Control laws to deal with. Having another set of Rent Control laws by the City of Inglewood in addition to this is redundant and inefficient. Adding more government adds more costs to housing, and does not go to increasing housing. Moreover, adding a tax per unit, while restricting rent increases is counter productive.
How much regulation is really needed? How much money and time must landlords spend dealing with regulation upon regulation?
You would like rents to be lower? We do too. How can we keep rents lower while having to deal with so very many, many regulations.
Managing properties would be easy if not for all the requirements made by government. We spend more than half our time dealing with regulations instead of using this time to help out our residents and improve our properties. PLEASE STOP!!!   Enough regulation. The State has done enough. Piling on is unproductive.

 Respectfully, Lawrence Rubenstein, Ph.D., Apartment Owner in L.A. County