If you were a farmer, would the spring season be more important than fall?  For your crops to grow strong, will the sunshine or the rain make them grow faster?  Does it matter if some crops are ready to be harvested in one month and other crops are ready in six months?  Like a farmer, realize that each person on your property management team will grow and thrive best if you match the pace and structure of their work responsibilities with their unique behavioral styles. This article will address how a person’s steadiness impacts performance and future articles will discuss interaction, drive, and compliance¦all key components of the behavioral styles of those on your team.

Defining Steadiness
As a leader within your property management company, you certainly have recognized the diversity of behavioral styles of those on your team and you know how this impacts your bottom line.  Steadiness can best be described as the way a person responds to the pace of change in their property management environment.
For instance, their response to structure, change or multi-tasking will be a good indicator of their level of steadiness.  A person’s level of steadiness, whether it is lower or higher, can be an asset to your company. Your level of steadiness as a leader is a combination of your inherent nature and the nurturing of your upbringing.  In addition, your steadiness was formed by the time you were ten or twelve years old and will not be likely to change over the course of your lifetime.
Tip from The Coach: Time for you to be the coach!  On a scale of 1-100, what level of steadiness does Diane Sawyer have?  Does it matter?  Based on her level of steadiness, does it matter how she prepares for each evening’s newscast?  As a leader within your property management company, does it matter how you prepare for important decisions or complete projects?  Can a person with a steady pace work in a pressured, hurried environment?

Looking for Clues
When working with those on your property management team, a person’s level of steadiness can be easily determined by looking for some observable clues.  For instance, a person with a higher level of steadiness will be patient, empathetic, a team player and loyal to their co-workers.  In addition, the physical clues of a person with a higher level of steadiness include good listening skills, good planning abilities, a gift for calming others, and an ability to mask their emotions.
On the other hand, a person with a lower level of steadiness will prefer an unstructured environment, may act without planning and will be happy to take on many tasks/projects simultaneously.  The physical clues of a person with a lower level of steadiness will be someone who is visibly emotional, restless, intense and very animated.  A person with a lower level of steadiness is passionate about their multi-tasking skills, which are invaluable to all teams.
Tip from The Coach: To quickly determine whether a person has a lower or higher level of steadiness ask yourself these two questions about each person on your property management team:

¢    Is this person more introverted or extroverted?
¢    Is this person more people oriented or task oriented?

Remember, a person’s level of steadiness will offer visual, verbal and non-verbal clues.

Coaching a Person With a Higher/Lower Level of Steadiness
Ready for the next step?  Once you have determined whether a person on your property management team has a higher or lower level of steadiness¦the rest is easy!  When communicating with a person who has a higher level of steadiness, here are some specific ways to maximize your effectiveness:

¢    Be patient when discussing their goals and ideas
¢    Show sincere interest in them personally
¢    Present information logically and in a non-threatening fashion
¢    Ask specific “how” questions.

To coach a person with a lower level of steadiness, here are some tips:

¢    Set energetic goals
¢    Provide a high level of activity
¢    Keep this person involved in lots of new projects or ideas
¢    Pair this person with a person that has a higher level of steadiness so projects/tasks are completed

Tip from The Coach: As the leader within your property management company, your teams will deliver peak performance when you have carefully selected a team with a range of lower and higher levels of steadiness.  In addition, when hiring a new employee for your property management team it is critical to match a person’s level of steadiness with a compatible work environment.

Would you like to know how your level of steadiness measures on a scale of 1-100?  Would you like to know the level of those on your property management team or be able to measure the level of steadiness of people you are interviewing for a position within your company?  Send an E-mail to ernest@powerhour.com and The Coach will E-mail you a one page behavior assessment form which can be completed in ten minutes or less. Scan/E-mail your assessment form back to our office at ernest@powerhour.com and in return, you will be confidentially mailed an 11-page assessment* (a $100 value) outlining your unique steadiness and behavioral style.  In addition, once you receive your assessment we will schedule a 45-minute call (a $400 value) to review your results. [* A small processing/analysis fee of $25 will be assessed, limit one per company]

Ernest F. Oriente, a business coach since 1995 [28,860 hours], a property management industry professional since 1988–the author of SmartMatch Alliances–and the founder of PowerHour…[ www.powerhour.com and www.powerhourseo.com and www.pirmg.com.  To subscribe to his free property management newsletter go to: www.powerhour.com.  PowerHour® is based in Olympic-town¦Park City, Utah, at 435-615-8486, by E-mail ernest@powerhour.com or visit their website: www.powerhour.com.

Leave a Reply